Giving Tuesday: Please Support our Afghanistan Emergency Relief Fund

Several months have passed since the US withdrawal from Afghanistan. Though global media attention is dying down, the crisis continues and the risk faced by our partners increases with each passing day as the Taliban ramps up violence against Afghan civil society.

Following the fall of Kabul, we formed the Afghan Solidarity Coalition with a small band of NGOs, academics and others. Together, we are working to get our Afghan colleagues and families, around 2,000 in total, to safety.

On Giving Tuesday, please support our Afghanistan Emergency Relief Fund. See how your money can help save lives and futures and re-share to spread the word.

Sign-On: Action Points to Guarantee the Rights, Safety and Health of Women and Girls in Afghanistan

The international community needs to take urgent action to ensure Afghan women and girls across all ethnic and religious communities, in urban and rural areas, feel safe and have equal rights and opportunities to a life of dignity, peace, safety and justice.

To achieve this overarching goal, and to ensure that there is no regression in the context of the impending humanitarian crisis, we have stated four key outcomes and offered specific actions by international actors and specific actions by the Taliban.

Humanitarian Response to Afghanistan Must Not Do Harm

Given the gendered segregation of society that the Taliban has already instigated, the delivery of aid to women and girls will be even more highly dependent on female Afghan aid workers and local women-led civil society organizations (CSOs). Such organizations have traditionally been the key conduits to reaching the most needy and marginalized sectors of society. They are more essential now.

We have offered 10 practical steps that the UN and other international humanitarian actors can take in designing and implementing their humanitarian response.

Help At-Risk Afghans With Your Donation

We are a coalition of NGOs, academics, activists, women’s rights defenders, journalists, artists, filmmakers and peacebuilders. We are working to get our Afghan colleagues and families, who are under direct threat from the Taliban, to safety. They have worked to bring peace to Afghanistan over the last 20 years, have fought for the rights of all Afghans, and especially women, girls and minority groups in direct opposition to the Taliban. They now come to us for help because nobody came for them.

The Taliban have seized control of Afghanistan. What does that mean for women and girls? (CNN)

A female journalist receives a call warning that they “will come soon.” A woman lawmaker sits and waits for her killers. A little girl wonders how much longer her school gates will remain open.

For Afghanistan’s women and girls, this is the terrifying uncertainty they now find themselves in.

As Taliban leaders tell international media they “don’t want women to be victimized,” a more sinister reality is unfolding on the ground.

Talking to Sheena McKenzie at CNN about what the Taliban takeover could mean for women and girls in Afghanistan, ICAN’s founder and CEO, Sanam Naraghi Anderlini, warns: “Once the diplomats leave, the journalists leave, the international NGOs leave, they are going to basically lock the doors… God knows what we’ll see then.”